Blog

13-11-2016

Response to Two Different Frequencies of Intermittent Hypoxic Training Methods Subjects –  10 competitive cyclists (competitive category 2-4).  All riders will be well-trained, have raced this passed season, and have no history of injury in last 6 months. Pre-screening –  Subjects will undergo a pre-screening blood test in order to get baseline measurements for Hb,...

13-11-2016

It is with great sadness that everyone here at TCR learned of the sudden passing of Hugh Fergusson. Hugh was one of the original clients at TCR and has been a fixture at our computrainer classes and bike camps from the beginning. He was always ready with a warm, welcoming smile and will be remembered...

13-11-2016

Training with power is the most precise and detailed way to get results. But to get the most out of your Computrainer sessions at TCR, you need to know what the numbers mean and how to interpret them. There are a few certain key terms that you need to understand in order to take full...

29-10-2016

Have you ever had an injury? Perhaps just a niggle of discomfort? Have you been training for years with no problems but the second you increase mileage, weight or speed something arises? Welcome to the life of being active! The goal is to stay active! Whether you are new to exercise or an experienced ironman...

29-10-2016

Have you ever had an injury? Perhaps just a niggle of discomfort? Have you been training for years with no problems but the second you increase mileage, weight or speed something arises? Welcome to the life of being active! The goal is to stay active! Whether you are new to exercise or an experienced ironman...

29-10-2016

IM Reflections Ironman # 8 is in the books! This was my 3rd time in Coeur d’Alene – a course I love because of all the climbing in it J I was hoping for a good race – I know the course and had had a solid phase of preparation, really focusing on functional strength...

29-10-2016

IM Reflections Ironman # 8 is in the books! This was my 3rd time in Coeur d’Alene – a course I love because of all the climbing in it J I was hoping for a good race – I know the course and had had a solid phase of preparation, really focusing on functional strength...

29-10-2016

Strength Training As triathletes you are required to have incredible athletic endurance with the use of many muscle groups. Many triathletes wonder why additional strength training is important if they train properly in the three discipline’s. Let me outline what, why and how so you have a better understanding and then you can decide whether...

29-10-2016

There is certainly never a dull moment in my life. I work full time here at TCR heading up the computrainer and triathlon training programs, as well as having an extensive network of personal coaching clients, I train for Ironman triathlons (have raced 8 in the last 5 years, along with many half Ironmans and...

Stretching and Rolling: An important part of the training routine

By Thalia Edwards, MSc

Stretching and rolling for athletes is a poplar discussion these days. With a difference in genetics/physical make-up, athletic backgrounds, sport disciplines, past injuries, movement patterns and personality it has taught me there are no rules when it comes to stretching and rolling, each person is individual. Having said that there are techniques and strategies to use. In the following blog, you will find out why people stretch and roll and the techniques involved.

Why stretch and roll?  

You may have heard stretching causes injuries in runners, it decreases power, and it does not prevent delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). So why do we promote stretching and rolling? In my experience, I have found athletes stretch & roll to:

  • Increase range of movement (ROM) – while your sport may not require you to be flexible I can guarantee you will have increased performance if you move properly. What I mean by this is your functional movement for that sport requires specific muscles to be mobile and engaged. For example, if your hip flexors are tight this will torque your pelvis so your low back tightens and your gluteal muscles don’t fire. Whether you are a runner or cyclist, compensation of this kind will inhibit your full potential as an athlete.
  • Injury prevention – as mentioned above if a specific area is tight and therefore compensating this may lead to future injuries. I see this more often when one side of the body is tighter than the other (ex. IT Band or Achilles tendon).
  • Feels good – this is where it isn’t just to improve circulation or stretch those muscles fibers in a physical way but as a mental exercise. People may choose to do this through Yoga to relax the mind and focus on breathing, while others find it to stimulate and enhance their mind. Holding a position that is not very comfortable but knowing it will feel better after is a common comment. “It’s a good type of pain” they will say.

What techniques are there?

  • Stretching 
    • Static
      • a prolonged stretch where a position is held to increase the length of the muscle
      • Hold stretch 30-45s, release and shake out muscle, repeat same hold
      • You should be able to hold and stay relaxed with deep breathes
      • Performed once the muscles are warm (following workout)
    • Dynamic
      • A repetitive motion where the joint moves to increase muscle mobility
      • You should not feel pain during the movements but over 10-20 reps should be able to stretch further
      • Performed prior to exercise to prepare muscle and joints for movement
  • Rolling:

The foam roller has become a new and effective piece of any athlete and gym’s equipment. A way to increase a muscle’s range motion or decrease pain resulting from a tight muscle through the following technique:

  • If you continue to constantly roll back and forth over a muscle while its painful, it may cause increased tightness.
  • Apply pressure from the roller to sensitive/painful areas of the muscle such as a trigger points or knots by holding for a few seconds (20-45s), then roll lightly above and below to flush and reapply pressure

So, take time to stretch roll but listen to what your body is telling you. You can overdo it and cause muscle strains so move slow and allow time for that muscle to soften and release. If an area is not releasing you may need assistance from a sports medical professional (i.e. physio, sports massage, or chiro). Enjoy that small part of your week when you can stretch and roll… your muscles will thank you!

Fat Burning, Fat Diets and Fat Loss

By Cory Fagan MSc

 

Fat is back!  Sugar is the bad guy and butter is beautiful.  Since the 1980’s, we have had a generation of confused people trying to figure out what to eat and what to avoid.  We still have traces of the “fat-phobia foods” in the grocery stores with Fat-free yogurts and Fat free chips but it is not advertised like it once was.  It has taken 30 years for the food industry to realize that avoiding fat made us fat!  A lot of this fat avoidance was started by the Big Sugar industry who wanted to push sugar since it is an extremely profitable product that you can put in just about every food product.  Foods that you never thought had sugar in them such as beef jerky, peanut butter, salad dressing, yogurt, ketchup, and even toothpaste are all laced with sugar. Go to your fridge and check it out.  From a business perspective, those Big Sugar guys were brilliant.  Just about everyone was eating their sugar!

 

At onset, the fat-free movement made sense.  If you do not eat fat, you should not get fat.  But that is not correct nor that simple.  Many are still confused by this.  The science is poorly explained behind this idea.  We still need to eat and get calories in.  So, when we cut fat, we simply ate more carbohydrate, sugars and a lot more sweeteners.  We thought that sugar is different than fat, right?  Not much.   Sugar is like Fat’s little annoying cousin.  Different but still related.  Too much sugar in your body is not excreted out like when we eat too much protein.  It is stored!  How is it stored?  It transforms itself into fat molecules and then is deposited all over your body.  What?!  Yes, the 30-year secret Big Sugar did not want you to know.  Who would have thought that Fat and Sugar were cousins!

 

This brings us to the last five years in the nutrition industry.   People are making food taste great again by using butter and all types of oils like coconut and olive.  Extreme diets like the old “Atkins” or “Keto-genic” are back in and people are losing weight without eating salads four times a day!  We are not promoting to go eat bacon and eggs all day long, but you can see how it works and you do not have to starve yourself to lose weight.

 

Our palettes are happier but we still get questions on “how does eating fat help us lose fat?!”   Well, you need to dig into the science of metabolism.  If your diet is low in sugar and you have at least 30-50% of your calories from fat, your body will burn fat.  We see this in Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR) tests.   Low sugar people burn about 80-100% fat at rest.  We call them “fat-burners.” Higher carbohydrate / sugary diets burn on average 40-50% fat at rest.  We call these people “sugar-burners.”  This is not ideal as your body should not use its precious carb stores to do things like sleep, type and read.

 

The body can be the most efficient endurance machine on the planet if you let it.  People today are running ultra-marathons and doing Ironman with minimal amounts of sugar.   They eat a diet with 30-50% fat before the race, fuel with similar products and maybe use a couple gels to finish.  It is not that long ago where people would consume 2-4 gels per hour until the race was over.  On a typical Ironman event, this would equate to 15-20+ gels on race day.  That works out to $50-90 in sugar for just one event.   You can see those Big Sugar business guys smiling all the way to the bank…until today!  So, do a food log, how much sugar are you eating?  Dig into what’s in your food.  Are you a fat-burner or a sugar-burner?!

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